gingadan.com

SN 1006 (Supernova Remnant)


Home > Black Hole > SN1006
Down
Movie

SN 1006
Supernova Remnant (超新星残骸)
SNR

星座 (Constellation)

おおかみ座 (Lup) (Lupus)


距離 (Distance)
7,000光年 (7,000 light-years)

SN 1006 is a supernova remnant located 7,000 light years from the Earth in the constellation Lupus.

SN 1006 (Supernova Remnant) : Picture

Supernova Remnant SN 1006
X-rays from Supernova Remnant SN 1006
(C) NASA/CXC/P. Frank Winkler (Middlebury College)
What looks like a puff-ball is surely the remains of the brightest supernova in recorded human history. In 1006 AD, it was recorded as lighting up the nighttime skies above areas now known as China, Egypt, Iraq, Italy, Japan, and Switzerland. The expanding debris cloud from the stellar explosion, found in the southerly constellation Lupus, still puts on a cosmic light show across the electromagnetic spectrum. In fact, the above image results from three colors of X-rays taken by the orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory. Now known as the SN 1006 supernova remnant, the debris cloud appears to be about 60 light-years across and is understood to represent the remains of a white dwarf star. Part of a binary star system, the compact white dwarf gradually captured material from its companion star. The buildup in mass finally triggered a thermonuclear explosion that destroyed the dwarf star. Because the distance to the supernova remnant is about 7,000 light-years, that explosion actually happened 7,000 years before the light reached Earth in 1006. Shockwaves in the remnant accelerate particles to extreme energies and are thought to be a source of the mysterious cosmic rays.

SN 1006 Supernova Remnant
SN 1006 Supernova Remnant
(C) NASA, ESA, Zolt Levay (STScI)

SN 1006: A Supernova Ribbon
SN 1006: A Supernova Ribbon from Hubble
(C) NASA, ESA, Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA); Acknowledgement: W. Blair et al. (JHU)
What created this unusual space ribbon? Most assuredly, one of the most violent explosions ever witnessed by ancient humans. Back in the year 1006 AD, light reached Earth from a stellar explosion in the constellation of Lupus, creating a "guest star" in the sky that appeared brighter than Venus and lasted for over two years. The supernova, now cataloged at SN 1006, occurred about 7,000 light years away and has left a large remnant that continues to expand and fade today. Pictured above is a small part of that expanding supernova remnant dominated by a thin and outwardly moving shock front that heats and ionizes surrounding ambient gas. SN 1006 now has a diameter of nearly 60 light years. Within the past year, an even more powerful explosion occurred far across the universe that was visible to modern humans, without any optical aid, for a few seconds.

SN 1006: History's Brightest Supernova
SN 1006: History's Brightest Supernova
(C) Frank Winkler (Middlebury College) et al., AURA, NOAO, NSF

Supernova Remnant SN 1006 SN 1006 Supernova Remnant
Supernova Remnant SN 1006
(C) NASA
SN 1006 Supernova Remnant
(C) NASA
Up
Up

SN 1006 (Supernova Remnant) : Movie

SN 1006 in 60 Seconds
The brightest supernova ever recorded on Earth, this spectacular light show was documented in China, Japan, Europe, and the Arab world. It was brighter than Venus, and visible during the day for weeks.
Up
Home > Black Hole > SN1006
Up

gingadan.com ブログパーツ