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Simeis 147 (Supernova Remnant)


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Simeis 147
Supernova Remnant (超新星残骸)
SNR


別名 (Other names)
Spaghetti Nebula, SNR G180.0-01.7, Sharpless 2-240, Sh2-240, S147

星座 (Constellation)
おうし座 (Tau) (Taurus)

距離 (Distance)
3,000光年 (3,000 light-years)

Simeis 147 (Spaghetti Nebula) is a supernova remnant located 3,000 light years from the Earth in the constellation Taurus.

Simeis 147 (Supernova Remnant) : Picture

Simeis 147: Supernova Remnant
Simeis 147: Supernova Remnant
(C) Rogelio Bernal Andreo (Deep Sky Colors)
It's easy to get lost following the intricate filaments in this detailed mosaic image of faint supernova remnant Simeis 147 (S147). Also cataloged as Sh2-240, it covers nearly 3 degrees or 6 full moons on the sky. That's about 150 light-years at the stellar debris cloud's estimated distance of 3,000 light-years. Anchoring the frame at the right, bright star Elnath (Beta Tauri) is seen towards the boundary of the constellations Taurus and Auriga, almost exactly opposite the galactic center in planet Earth's sky. This sharp composite includes image data taken through a narrow-band filter to highlight emission from hydrogen atoms tracing the shocked, glowing gas. The supernova remnant has an estimated age of about 40,000 years, meaning light from the massive stellar explosion first reached Earth 40,000 years ago. But the expanding remnant is not the only aftermath. The cosmic catastrophe also left behind a spinning neutron star or pulsar, all that remains of the original star's core.

Simeis 147: Supernova Remnant
Simeis 147: Supernova Remnant
(C) Nobuhiko Miki

Simeis 147: Supernova Remnant
Simeis 147: Supernova Remnant
(C) J-P Metsävainio (Astro Anarchy)

Simeis 147: Supernova Remnant from Palomar
Simeis 147: Supernova Remnant from Palomar
(C) Digitized Sky Survey, ESA/ESO/NASA FITS Liberator
Color Composite: Davide De Martin (Skyfactory)

Simeis 147: Supernova Remnant
Simeis 147: Supernova Remnant
(C) Robert Gendler

Semeis 147: Supernova Remnant
Semeis 147: Supernova Remnant
(C) Steve Mandel

Downtown Auriga
Downtown Auriga
(C) Rogelio Bernal Andreo (Deep Sky Colors)
Rich in star clusters and nebulae, the ancient constellation of Auriga, the Charioteer, rides high in northern winter night skies. Spanning nearly 24 full moons (12 degrees) on the sky, this deep telescopic mosaic view recorded in January shows off some of Auriga's most popular sights for cosmic tourists. The crowded field sweeps along the plane of our Milky Way galaxy in the direction opposite the galactic center. Need directions? Near the bottom of the frame, at the Charioteer's boundary with Taurus the Bull, the bright bluish star Elnath is known as both Beta Tauri and Gamma Aurigae. On the far left and almost 300 light-years away, the busy, looping filaments of supernova remnant Simeis 147 cover about 150 light-years. Look toward the right to find emission nebula IC 410, significantly more distant, some 12,000 light-years away. Star forming IC 410 is famous for its embedded young star cluster, NGC 1893, and tadpole-shaped clouds of dust and gas. The Flaming Star Nebula, IC 405, is just a little farther along. Its red, convoluted clouds of glowing hydrogen gas are energized by hot O-type star AE Aurigae. Two of our galaxy's open star clusters, Charles Messier's M36 and M38 line up in the starfield above, familiar to many binocular-equipped skygazers.

A Lunar Eclipse on Solstice Day
A Lunar Eclipse on Solstice Day
(C) Jerry Lodriguss (Catching the Light)
Sometime after sunset tonight, the Moon will go dark. This total lunar eclipse, where the entire Moon is engulfed in the shadow of the Earth, will be visible from all of North America, while the partial phase of this eclipse will be visible throughout much of the rest of the world. Observers on North America's east coast will have to wait until after midnight for totality to begin, while west coasters should be able to see a fully darkened moon before midnight. Pictured above is a digital prediction, in image form, for how the Moon and the surrounding sky could appear near maximum darkness. Rolling your cursor over the image will bring up labels. Parts of the Moon entering the circle labeled umbra will appear the darkest since the Sun there will be completely blocked by the Earth. Parts of the Moon entering the circle labeled penumbra will be exposed to some direct sunlight, and so shine by some degree by reflected light. The diminished glare of the normally full Moon will allow unusually good viewings of nearby celestial wonders such as the supernova remnant Simeis 147, the open star cluster M35, and the Crab Nebula M1. By coincidence this eclipse occurs on the day with the shortest amount of daylight in the northern hemisphere -- the Winter Solstice. This solstice eclipse is the first in 456 years, although so far it appears that no one has figured out when the next solstice eclipse will be.

Simeis 147 Simeis 147
Simeis 147
(C) Rogelio Bernal Andreo
Simeis 147
(C) Nobuhiko Miki
Simeis 147 Simeis 147
Simeis 147
(C) J-P Metsävainio
Simeis 147
(C) ESA/ESO/NASA
Simeis 147 Semeis 147
Simeis 147
(C) Robert Gendler
Semeis 147
(C) Steve Mandel
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